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Author Topic: Is Mercedes W12 F1 car big speed secret moveable hydraulic damping shocks?  (Read 1027 times)

Offline John S

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The German website Pitwalk.de thinks so and suggests that the Mercedes car uses hydraulic shock absorbers to gain speed, both on the sides and on the third element in the middle of the car, in the transmission. The hydraulics work via small valves in the dampers that let the hydraulic oil through in different volume flows. If you manage to influence the opening and closing times of these valves, you can virtually pull the dampers down. This allows the whole car to be lowered, reducing drag on the straights and increasing top speeds.

https://www.pitwalk.de/pitblog/fuhr-hamilton-illegal

In Formula 1, it is illegal to have this system automated. Active suspensions are not allowed. Therefore, to make it legal in Formula 1, the driver himself needs to make a command. If Pitwalk.de is right and Mercedes really does have this on the car, Hamilton will need to actively do something and this could be the forward and backwards movement on the steering wheel.
Footage of the steering wheel being possibly moved 'back n forth' during Quali in Brazil is highlighted in a video clip below titled 'Lewis using DAS System during Qualy Lap steering wheel moves'. So Are Merc able to manipulate the ride height this way????








Racing is life - everything else is just waiting. (Steve McQueen)

Offline Jericoke

Re: Is Mercedes W12 F1 car big speed secret moveable hydraulic damping shocks?
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2021, 04:53:43 PM »
I kinda hope this is true.

I love the innovation in the sport, stretching the rules to their absurd limits.

Almost seems ridiculous the cars DON'T have this sort of control over the suspension.  If it's legal, why not?

Offline Alianora La Canta

Re: Is Mercedes W12 F1 car big speed secret moveable hydraulic damping shocks?
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2021, 10:47:15 AM »
Probably because it's very complicated and was supposed to be banned in 2021 along with standard DAS (Mercedes may well have found a loophole and I can completely believe that).
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Offline cosworth151

Re: Is Mercedes W12 F1 car big speed secret moveable hydraulic damping shocks?
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2021, 02:49:44 PM »
I can see a bit of logic in not allowing automatic ride height control. As much control as possible should be left in the hands of the driver. That said, letting the driver adjust ride height seems like a good thing.

This isn't some new, cutting edge tech. Claw Grrl had a mid-1990's Lincoln LSC that had full automatic ride height control:

“You can search the world over for the finer things, but you won't find a match for the American road and the creatures that live on it.”
― Bob Dylan

Offline Jericoke

Re: Is Mercedes W12 F1 car big speed secret moveable hydraulic damping shocks?
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2021, 02:47:25 PM »
I can see a bit of logic in not allowing automatic ride height control. As much control as possible should be left in the hands of the driver. That said, letting the driver adjust ride height seems like a good thing.

This isn't some new, cutting edge tech. Claw Grrl had a mid-1990's Lincoln LSC that had full automatic ride height control:



I drove a Lincoln Mark VIII as a teen (my dad had borrowed it, hardly my daily driver), and it was the most fun I've ever had driving.

 


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